Record flooding in West Virginia has killed at least 24 people, destroyed hundreds of homes, and stranded thousands. Parts of West Virginia received 10 inches of rain, swelling mountain creeks and rivers across the region. West Virginia Governor Earl Ray Tomblin has declared a state of emergency for 44 of West Virginia’s 55 counties as boats, helicopters, and National Guard troops rescue people from rooftops and cars.

In the aftermath, several local and regional organizations have stepped up to help. The Ohio Valley Environmental Council (OVEC) have established drop-off locations for supplies that will be distributed across West Virginia. A complete list of drop-off locations can be found at their website. Items most in need include bottled water, nonperishable food items, clothing, toiletries, diapers, and flashlights. OVEC is also seeking volunteers to help load and distribute emergency supplies: ohvec.org.

Relief supplies can also be donated at the State Capitol in Charleston, W.Va. from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m.

West Virginia American Water is supplying tankers of water while they work to restore water service to the region. Residents should bring their own containers to fill. Tanker locations can be found at facebook.com/wvamwater.

The Kanawha-Charleston Humane Society is coordinating the search for lost and missing pets: 304-342-1576.

For those outside the area wishing to help, donations to the Red Cross is the best and most reliable way. Donate by visiting redcross.org, calling 1-800-RED CROSS or texting the word REDCROSS to 90999.

Interested in lending a hand? The Red Cross also needs on-the-ground volunteers: volunteerconnection.redcross.org.

West Virginia University is also leading donation and volunteer efforts. Its Dollars for Disaster West Virginia Flood Relief is partnered with the American Red Cross and United Way; donate here.