Travel across Virginia and you’ll find a Virginia State Park along the way. Every region offers distinctive state parks — from the mountains to the Atlantic Ocean, from the Valley to Southside Virginia. Find your park and find your adventure.

When it comes to hiking, regardless of your experience level, you’ll find an adventurous and challenging hiking trail in a Virginia State Park.

More than 160 miles of the park system’s 626 miles of trails are reserved for hiking, and hiking is allowed on more than 397 miles of multiuse trails.

You can find a unique challenge hiking the highest and lowest points in Virginia.

Mount Rogers is Virginia’s highest point at 5,729 feet. And Old Rag is 3,284 feet. But between them, Virginia’s second-highest point is in Grayson Highlands State Park, at an elevation of more than 5,000 feet. Spend the night in a yurt and enjoy the park’s 13 hiking trails leading to panoramic vistas, scenic waterfalls and a 200-year-old pioneer cabin. The park also offers access to the Appalachian Trail and trails in the surrounding Jefferson National Forest.

Stroll along the Atlantic Ocean at Virginia’s lowest point in False Cape State Park. The West Dike, Barbour Hill, Sand Ridge Beach Loop is an 8.9-mile hike through remote sand along the Atlantic Ocean. This is not a hike for beginners, but it delivers. Carry plenty of water. Trails are closed Nov. 1 – March 31.

Douthat State Park is another mountain park with fun and challenging hikes. Mountain Side Trail is narrow and mountainous; it’s not for children or the inexperienced. From the 1.2-mile trail, take the equally difficult 2.4-mile Mountain Top Trail. Serious hikers strap on a pack and hike the 16 miles of trails on the park’s perimeter.

Shenandoah River State Park offers 24 miles of trails from one edge of the park to the other. On the park’s west side, take Culler’s Trail, to Shale Barrens Trail, to the Bear Bottom Loop for a stimulating 8-mile hike.

Beaver Lake Trail – A half-hour from the state capital, Pocahontas State Park has 11 hiking trails over 5 miles long. At 2.3-miles, Beaver Lake Trail is a moderate loop with slight elevation changes. For an additional challenge, head over to the 4 miles Co-op Trail. With views of Swift Creek Lake, you’ll see why this is quickly becoming the most popular trail in the park.  

For a special personal challenge, visit all the parks.

Enroll in the Virginia State Parks Trail Quest program and be rewarded when you visit parks.

You’ll earn five different and attractive pins. Get one for your first park visit and others after visiting 5, 10, 20 and all 38 parks. Are you up for the challenge?