Charlottesville Youth Climate Strike

Join in the global climate strike movement on Friday, September 20 at noon on the Downtown Mall. Charlottesville area youth and their allies will be speaking out and marching to demand a local response to the global climate emergency. The Charlottesville march is being led by 11-year-old Gudrun Campbell. Join Campbell on today’s march for the environment and sign up with the link: https://actionnetwork.org/events/charlottesville-youth-climate-strike-2

There are marches happening across the globe from September 20th-27th. Find one near you and join the fight!

Find a march near you HERE: https://globalclimatestrike.net/

A yak named Meteor escaped on the way to the butcher in Virginia

A yak named Meteor escaped its owner on the way to the butcher this week and is on the loose somewhere in central Virginia. Meteor’s owner told Nelson County animal control that the yak had kicked off the back door of a livestock trailer about 10 a.m. Tuesday at a stop sign in Lovingston, Va., about 40 miles southwest of Charlottesville.

Nelson County Animal Control Officer Kevin Wright said Friday that the search for Meteor continues. The animal initially retreated to the mountains but has since been seen on both sides of Route 29 near Lovingston. Meteor’s owner Robert Cissell said yaks are able to survive for long periods without human supervision and that Meteor is worth more than $1,000 at the market.

“This is how we make our living,” he said. “Unfortunately, for me, it’s not the cute animal story everyone thinks.”

Have you noticed a lot of dragonflies this week?

Lovely weather we’re having- blue skies, crisp air, and massive clusters of dragonflies! So much so that experts believe they are to blame for strange radar readings at the National Weather Service office in Wakefield.

As Wakefield meteorologist Mike Montefusco explained to The Virginian Pilot: “Obviously we’re not bug experts on our end, but there was a case like this in the Cleveland office last week where they did determine it was dragonflies. So that’s our running theory at this point.”

Some of the readings show that the dragonflies are around 10,000ft in the air. Sally Entrekin, an aquatic entomologist at Virginia Tech said that they are migrating when they are up that high. While it’s impossible to say if the dragonflies picked up on local radar are indeed local or just passing through, they’re all heading south ahead of winter, taking advantage of lofty winds that have recently shifted to blow that way.

“If they’re up that high, they’re on the move,” Entrekin said, searching for warmer places to lay eggs.